History

 

Tink Wig, a planned community (non-profit corp.), is located in Lackawaxen Township, Pike County, Pennsylvania.

The first people of European ancestry to inhabit Lackawaxen Village (designated in 1798) were Jonathan Conkling and John Barnes who settled here before the American Revolution. It was not uncommon for them to flee from the area to the Fort at Westfalls during periods of unrest between the settlers and the local Lenni Lenape and Iroquois Indians who lived along the Lackawaxen River.

The Lackawaxen (Lenni Lenape name meaning "swift waters") area was used mainly for lumbering purposes. The cut lumber was floated down the river on large rafts to the Delaware River. One of the rafts men was named William R. Walker; he built the first sawmill at Tink’s Wig on land purchased by his father, Jesse Walker from a Col. Hooper.

Israel, Able and Eli Hammers, three brothers belonging to the Society of Friends of Philadelphia came to Lackawaxen around 1820. They purchased three tracts of land covered with white and yellow pines located three miles from the Lackawaxen River, on the outlet of Tink Pond. Some believe that they probably lived in the vicinity of where our dam and clubhouse is today. They constructed a dam and a sawmill for the manufacturing of lumber. After one of the brothers died, the land was deeded to their sister who lived in Philadelphia. She subsequently sold the land to a Benjamin Tanner. It has been said that the two remaining brothers became wards of the Township and upon their deaths they were buried on the banks of Little Blooming Grove Creek, opposite Millville.

In 1870, and again in 1892, Mr. Felix Sartori purchased large tracts of land in the area. The tract(s) that he purchased in 1870 was from Mr. Batista Menotti. The fifty-acre tract that he purchased in 1892 (for one dollar) was from Mr. Paul Williams. In 1923 an heir of Felix Sartori’s, Mr. Olivo Sartori, sold the fifty-acre parcel to Mr. Hedwig Zingg for $1,800. That parcel was sold again in 1952; Mr. Michael Muldovan purchased it for $3,400. Mr. Muldovan subsequently sold the fifty-acres to the Tink-Wig Mountain Lake Forest Corporation for $55,000 in1972. At one time the seemingly now defunct Tink Wig Historical Committee was researching the history of the 1870 parcel, apparently to no avail.

About 1927 much of the additional property now called Tink Wig was owned by Mr. Mark Bauer. Initially Mr. Bauer used the land for selling lumber. Later, he established a vacation resort on the property. It had rustic cabins (renting for $45 per week), a meeting hall, a clubhouse and a small store for essentials. Outhouses were the vogue for vacationers at that time. Upon Mr. Bauer’s death in 1970, his heirs sold the property to a Mr. Fishbein who happened to be a developer.

The few Twp. records that exist indicate that development of the properties now known simply as Tink Wig began in the early 70s. Those Lackawaxen Twp. records (applications, sub-division permits and ordinances, etc.) reflect a 1972 date. Other records indicate that The Tink Wig Property Owners Association (TWPOA) was established in 1975 (originally Sections 1 through 5). It is said that Mr. Moe Greenspan was the individual who began organizing the community, which ultimately led to its establishment as a non-profit corporation. Mr. Al Architzel was the Community's first Chairperson and Mr. Greenspan was the Community's first Executive Director.

Other significant dates and occurrences:

The late 70s, twin brothers, Abe (a Board Member) and David Zwillinger, created the original Tink Wig logo. Abe’s widow Renee continues to be a resident of Tink Wig.

On July 2, 1979 the annual meeting was held in the Picnic Grove because the Developer refused to allow the Property Owners Association the use of the Clubhouse and other facilities.

The unified rules governing the Community was passed at the Annual meeting in 1983.

Also in 1983 dues were $135.00, all properties that were still owned by the Bank were turned over to the Property Owners Association and chipping and tarring of the roads began.

It is reasonable to believe that there are long time members who may still remember other significant dates. In the event that you care to share information or pictures please contact us by E-mail.